QUICK THOUGHT: Peace Officers Memorial Day - Do You Appreciate Law Enforcement Officers

By Kyle Quick
New Haven, Mo. - Flags at statehouses and federal buildings across the country are at half-staff from sunrise to sunset today in honor of Peace Officers Memorial Day.

While all your major media outlets will cover ceremonies held this week in remembrance of  the men and women who gave their lives to protect others, the other 360 days officers are rarely put on a pedestal.

The next time you see a police officer be glad, the day you rarely see officers be deathly afraid because who is going to protect you?

In 2012, 127 federal, state, and local law enforcement officers paid the ultimate sacrifice.  On average two officers are killed each week and 10 every month.  That’s 10 families who suffer the lose of a mom or dad, son or daughter, and a wife or husband all because these individuals chose to sacrifice their lives for the lives of everyday citizens.

According to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund the top cause of officer fatalities in 2012 were traffic related-incidents, which claimed 50 lives.

Forty-nine officers were killed by gunfire while 28 others died due to other causes.

Something to think about is the number of times you’ve seen main stream media cover a “breaking news story” about officers making a traffic stop and arresting someone driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol; how many lives did they just save.

What about the countless hours officers spend taking specialized training courses so they are able to determine if someone is driving intoxicated.

The answer is never!

It is not as exciting as a high speed pursuit or even better yet when main stream media exploits law enforcement officers trying to apprehend a suspect, suddenly making officers look like the bad guy.

They forget the fact that the criminal who decided to run from police caused numerous innocent people who now are suddenly involved in a major car crash.

All of a sudden main stream media makes the criminal look like the victim, claiming police used “excessive force” while making the arrest.

If the subject ran from police do you think by asking them to “please lay down or stop running” is going to work?

Until you have walked in their shoes is it fare to automatically make your own assumption?

Remember, the next time you see a police officer be glad, the day you rarely see officers be deathly afraid because who is going to protect you?