Rosalie Laune

Chinese Lantern Festival At Missouri Botanical Garden

Photos and article by Rosalie Laune

The Chinese Lantern Festival opened at the Missouri Botanical Garden May 23 and will be there through August 23.

This year’s event has all new sets some of which depict cities in China and their botanical gardens. 

The MO Botanical Garden has a long history of collaboration with China.  The most recent is the Flora of China project which began in1988.  This international project resulted in the publication of a catalog of all Chinese wild plants. 

Poppy: A Remembrance of Fallen Heroes

By Rosalie Laune:

In Flanders fields the poppies blow Between the crosses, row on row, That mark our place; and in the sky The larks, still bravely singing, fly Scarce heard amid the guns below

We are the Dead. Short days ago We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow, Loved and were loved, and now we lie In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe: To you from failing hands we throw The torch; be yours to hold it high. If ye break faith with us who die We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

This poem was written in 1915 by Major John McCrae, a physician serving in a Canadian artillery unit during World War I. It is believed he wrote it after conducting a burial service for a young Canadian artillery officer who was killed in the Second Battle of Ypres in Belgium.

Lily: A Symbol of Life

By: Rosalie Laune - No other flower is associated with the observance of Easter more than the lily.  Its beautiful white flowers are symbolic of purity, joy, hope and life.  However, the lily was cultivated by civilizations long before it became associated with Easter and has symbolic meaning to many different religions.

The name “lily” is applied chiefly (and correctly) to any member of the genus Lilium and contains over 100 species. All are herbaceous perennials that arise from bulbs and produce large, showy flowers.  Most are native to temperate regions of the northern hemisphere.

Selma - St Louisans Answered The Call

Participants, some carrying American flags, marching in the civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama in 1965. (From Wikimedia Commons, the free media repository)

By Rosalie Laune

I read with interest the coverage in the Saturday St Louis  Post-Dispatch commemorating “Bloody Sunday” and the role St. Louisans played in the events in Selma, Alabama in 1965.

The Charles and Mary Vatterott family, Archbishop Joseph E Ritter and Sister Antona Ebo an African American nun, member of the Franciscans Sisters of St. Mary, were profiled in the coverage and one of them with ties to New Haven.